Tag Archive | nature

Snow Geese on Cayuga Lake ~

After Friday morning’s jaunt out to Cayuga Lake State Park to photograph the wildlife gathering there, I decided to take another crack at it today ~ only this time I went out at dinner time, and Al went with me.

 

Snow Geese Cayuga Lake 2

The lake was, yet again, inundated with white snow geese, as well as Canadian geese and a variety of ducks.  However, like before, they were all engaged in the middle of the lake ~ quite a distance away for me to test my optical zoom.  This time, I remembered to bring my winter gloves (fingertip optional), and I set up my tripod on the boat launch and watched.  It was still bitter cold as the wind whipped.  The mass of white geese looked like a strip of white snow on the center of the lake, and they all moved as one.  I looked away for a second, and when I looked back they had all begun to lift ~ all at the same time!  What an incredible sight!

Snow Geese Cayuga Lake 3

The above photo is a bit blurry, as I think the wind caught it a little bit and/or it shook from my trembling cold hands!  But you can clearly see the black tipped wings of the snow geese.  There was another photographer out there when I got there, and when he saw what I saw, I thought he was going to have a coronary right there!

 

Snow Geese Cayuga Lake 1

 

Here’s a look at them as they pass overhead.  They were honking up a storm ~ a very different sound than the Canadian goose.

 

Snow Geese CayugaLake 3-17-13 017

 

These two uncharacteristically lagged behind (maybe they were secretly “Graylag geese”).  Anyway, the flight of the flock didn’t last for long.  It seems they just lifted themselves for a bit to get more comfortable, then they settled back down for the evening.  Those few seconds that they filled the sky over Cayuga Lake were sure exciting!

Until next time, TTFN ~ Tamara Eckstadt

 

Advertisements

Montezuma Wildlife ~

I had been waiting for an opportune time to get out and take some photos, as the weather around here has been less than cooperative for a few weeks.  Well, today I have a day off from work, and rather than sleeping in, I was up and out the door by 7:15 a.m. and on my way to Cayuga Lake State Park and Montezuma Wildlife Refuge in Cayuga County looking for some photo ops.  I had heard that the snow geese were gathering on Cayuga Lake, and I’ve never been lucky enough to get any good photos of them, so I took a chance.

I made it to the boat launch at the Park and, sure enough, the lake was plastered with them… among other Canadian geese and a variety of ducks.  The sun was shining, but the wind was bitter cold and I’d forgotten my gloves.  Despite that, I watched them for awhile and tried to take some photos, but the snow geese seem to like the MIDDLE of the lake, and my zoom just didn’t quite perform well enough to get anything good.  So I left the boat launch and meandered my way up the lake a little bit, and soon found some geese nearer the shore that were somewhat accommodating.

Snow geese on Cayuga Lake, NY

Snow geese on Cayuga Lake, NY

Which end is up?

Snow geese on Cayuga Lake, NY

Snow geese on Cayuga Lake, NY

After leaving the shores of Cayuga Lake, I drove to nearby Montezuma Wildlife Refuge to see what, if any, wildlife would be seen today.  There were a few who reluctantly posed for me.

Canada geese on thin ice!

Canada geese on thin ice!

Adult Bald Eagle being harrassed by seagulls.

 

3 Immature Bald Eagles on the ice.

3 Immature Bald Eagles on the ice.

 My pictures aren’t the greatest… I think I was shivering at the time.    I sure am shivering now! And to those of you who will inevitably ask:  “Why do they call Bald Eagles “bald” when they aren’t”… here’s your answer ~  (from Wiki)  

First of all, bald eagles are not bald.
Some people say this bird was given the name “Bald eagle” because the lighter feathers on its head make the bird appear bald from a distance. In fact, the word “bald” comes from the old English term “balde” which originally meant white, not hairless.The bald eagle’s scientific name, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, stands for:

sea (halo), eagle (aeetos) and white (leukos), as in the feathers on the eagle’s head. So there you have it, the bald eagle is a seabird with a white head.

Until next time, TTFN ~ Tamara Eckstadt